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Thursday, 7 March 2013

The twist measuring machine

Hold onto your seatbelts, this episode is action packed. 

There's Yarn!
There's twist!
There's measurement!
Precision!
Science!
And Good Old-Fashioned Textile Testing!

What more could you ask for?

What's that I hear you say? An explanatory video of the Boyd yarn twisting machine?

Well of course good people, that you shall also have!

Right after this commercial, for science, precision and textile testing!


This is the twist measurement machine


This is where the twist is measured. You can widen the gap, but currently it is set at one inch.


The twist comes up on this readout.


First place one end of your yarn in this little pointed clamp, and fasten tightly.


Then take the yarn through the other, open, clamp, over the little guide wheel and through the little eyelet.


Now, to keep it taut, you attach a little weight. Bigger weights for heavier yarn, but this is a very light yarn, so we use a little weight. 


Now fasten this little clamp.


Then turn the handle in the appropriate direction until you can get the needle between the ply on the left hand side. And push it right while turning until the ply is completely open. The amount of twists per inch (or however long you've set the distance between the clamps) is given on the science-fictiony readout I showed you earlier.

Then go and do this another 19 times, and take the average of all your results and you should have a good approximation of the twist in your yarn.

Why am I doing this? Why, because I want to untwist and then retwist my yarn of course, that's why.

I want to add small bits of colour into the twist. But I can't get the twisting machine to work the way I want it. But more of that later, right now here's a video of the afore-mentioned machine in action. It's very exciting, I hope you can cope.



2 comments:

precision measuring machines said...

In this machine There's Yarn!There's twist!There's measurement!Precision!Science!And Good Old-Fashioned Textile Testing!All this in one makes it good precision machine.

Andrew Kieran said...

exactly, thanks for noticing